How to Create and Design Layouts with Folds

This article will help you figure out how to design and layout a document with folds.

How to Layout Designs with Folds

 

GRAPHIC DESIGN AND LAYOUTS WITH FOLDS

 

by Ben Baker

 

Copy that runs across a fold is often difficult to read, see and sometimes because of the compression of the folding machine, the ink on one page can leave an impression on the opposite page. That makes things even harder to read and comprehend.

 

The first thing you have to do when designing a project with folds is deciding WHERE you want it to fold.

 

Take a letter-sized sheet of paper. Fold it in half. This is a bifold project. You have determined where it will fold. Now, measure each fold, leaving about an eighth to a quarter-inch margin on each side of the fold. Most likely an eighth of an inch is plenty on a project no bigger than a sheet of paper. The bigger your project is, the more margin you’ll need at the fold to accommodate the folding press.

 

You know know how wide your text and image areas are.

 

A trifold project, like many brochures, is folding three times.

 

On the bifold, hold the paper so that you open it right to left like a book. Now you know which is Page 1, Page 2, Page 3 and Page 4. Page 1 is the front, Page 4 is the back. Pages 2 and 3 face each other on the inside.

 

The trifold is more complicated. Rather than 4 simple pages, the trifold has 6 pages that are interleaved.

 

Get a sheet of paper and let’s make a trifold.

 

The first fold is the right side of the sheet. Fold this over.

 

Now, get the left side of the sheet. Fold it over.

 

You have a trifold.

 

Number the pages now. Write 1 on the topmost page. Open this and right 2 on the left most page. You should still have the right side folded.

 

Open the right side so the sheet of paper is laying completely flat and open. In the middle write 3. On the right most side write 4.

 

Fold the right side back over. Write 5 on this.

 

Flip the sheet over. The only available space should be in the middle. This is the back, Write 6 on this. The back can be used as the mailing side for a mailed brochure. Think of 6 as the outside front of an envelope.

 

Now you have a physical template for a trifold product.

 

Ben Baker has managed to make a hexafold project once. Anything more complicated than that has so far eluded him.

[tags]folds, design folds, layout, design, graphic design[/tags]

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3 Comments

  1. Posted July 23, 2007 at 11:04 pm | Permalink

    Is there any chance Ben Baker could share his hexafold with us?
    I do alot of 5 and 6 fold borsjures and booklets, but a hexafold would be great.

  2. Posted July 26, 2007 at 11:01 am | Permalink

    Hi there. I will let Ben know that you are interested in a hexafold. Maybe he will post about it. :-) Thanks.

    Rachel

  3. Dam Do
    Posted November 20, 2008 at 6:44 am | Permalink

    Isnt a 6 fold the same with hexafold??

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