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Graphic Design Education and Your Career

graphic-designTalent + Education = Graphic Designer
Talent is always a big consideration for employers who are seeking individuals to fill positions, but the world of graphics, illustration, and art has changed dramatically with the use of computer design software and computer hardware.

Publishing houses, graphic design firms and other related businesses need people who are up-to-date in the latest graphic design methods and technology.

For entry level work and some higher-level design positions, design firms usually require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree.

Typical courses for a graphic design degree cover topics such as design principles, computer design software, layout and design, and graphics.

Associate’s degrees and certificates in graphic design are available at two-year community colleges, junior colleges, and graphic design colleges.

The curriculum for an associate or certificate in graphic design usually concentrates on the technical aspects of design work. Positions available for this level of education qualify you for some entry level jobs in graphic design or as an assistant to a graphic designer.

What Else Is Required?
Individuals who want to work as graphic designers should have good communication skills, the ability to multitask effectively, work effectively under pressure, and have a good eye for design, and detail.

Because the world of design is in constant change, companies who hire graphic designers need people who understand the current trends of design and where it may lead to in the future.

yellow-brick-roadWhere Do You Start?
Graphic design colleges are specifically geared toward education in the liberal arts and can help students to learn and use many of the tools required to enter this job field.

If you are considering a career as a graphic designer or want to increase your skills in this field of work, graphic design schools are available to help you achieve these goals.

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9 Comments

  1. Posted October 28, 2009 at 9:25 pm | Permalink

    Great article! I believe that graphic designs schools offering quality education can produce many talented graphic designers who can keep up with the ever-changing trends in graphic design.

  2. Kelly
    Posted October 29, 2009 at 8:30 pm | Permalink

    not sure graphic design education in other countries. But in China, It is really bad…..the teachers’ qualifications and design level especially commercial design level is too far from present society…completely out of date….

  3. Posted October 31, 2009 at 10:38 am | Permalink

    I totally agree that getting a bachelors is a wise decision. I chose a bachelors over an associates because in most cases it is required. I am attending AIO and love it because at my local on-campus college, the degree for Graphic Design consist of about 98 core course in english, math, and blah blah blah, and about 9 art classes. At least at AIO I am able to take mainly graphic design and art courses to prepare me for my career.

  4. Posted November 2, 2009 at 12:55 am | Permalink

    Graphic Design and web design are merging more and more everyday. If you’re thinking about going to school for graphic design it’s essential that you learn, at a minimum, how to design for the web. Even better is that you learn some basic html and css so you can be competitive.

    All the agencies want people who know at least html and css. Unless you’re working at a huge firm (like JWT) then you’ll only be required to do print or web. But lets face it, if you’re just starting out you’re probably not going to be working somewhere like that. So, entry level positions won’t even let you in the door unless you can multitask in the design arena.

  5. Posted November 3, 2009 at 7:32 am | Permalink

    Such a nice article about graphic designing schools, thanks for selection of this topic i love graphic designing at feel awe when see no body take step for the graphic designing development.

  6. Posted November 3, 2009 at 7:34 am | Permalink

    i am mad about the graphic designing work and very happy to read this post you did such a appreciative work.well done

  7. neil
    Posted November 6, 2009 at 4:17 pm | Permalink

    @Tangie:

    It isn’t so much the degree, it’s the knowledge. (Clients will not ask to look at your diploma or even ask where you studied, outside of friendly curiosity.) As to math, english, blah blah blah… these might seem unimportant, but imagine having a client come to you and ask for a quick brief on a Chaucer montage image, or an image featuring theorems.

    The point is, a well-rounded education is better than a limited one. You’ll be studying art and design for the rest of your life, you’re better off not limiting yourself when you have the opportunity to learn more about this wide world.

    Clients will always prefer designers who are knowledgeable.

  8. Mats
    Posted November 10, 2009 at 5:14 pm | Permalink

    What about posting a list of some good schools you know? I am currently looking for good graphical design schools, but the ones i find is often VERY commercial, very hard to get accepted to or just plain bad. I would first like to study basic design principles and then focus on web design.

    Some school suggestions would be much appriciated!

  9. admin
    Posted November 17, 2009 at 3:45 pm | Permalink

    Hi Mats,
    A good resource to go to for graphic design school suggestions is http://www.graphicdesignbasics.com They have a very extensive list of reviews on many design schools. We can’t list any schools by name here because we can’t show favoritism towards one school over an other. Hope this helps. :D

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